Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 1-16 of 16 documents


1. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Elisabete M. de Sousa

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

artigos

2. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Markus Gabriel, Dirk Michael Hennrich, Jorge Telles de Menezes

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
3. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Andrew Cooper

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Against the growing trend in philosophy toward naturalistic analysis, Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgment has gained significant attention. Some scholars suggest that Kant’s insights bear on our aesthetic appreciation of nature, others on our account of the life sciences. In this paper I draw these lines of inquiry together to identify two overlooked dimensions of Kant’s project: the role of moral hope in problematizing the limits of natural science and the role of culture in providing a solution. Kant argues that we cannot think consistently unless we are able to conceive of nature as a domain that is hospitable to human freedom. His response is to identify the productive capacity of the imagination to transform the material of nature into something more. While the prevailing conception of nature today is at best indifferent and at worst antagonistic to human habitation, this dimension of Kant’s work has much to bear on contemporary thought.
4. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Juan Diego Morales

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper I focus on the analysis of the concept of the physical and its implications for the formulation of physicalism. Most of the paper is “negative,” insofar as it intends to show why the most accepted formulation of physicalism, the theory of the supervenience or complete determination of the empirical phenomena by the microphysical characteristics, has deep empirical and conceptual deficiencies: on one hand, it seems to be incompatible with the results of different sciences and, on the other, it allows us to understand neither the scientific nor the daily use of the notion of the physical. If this is the case, then we have strong reasons for constructing a non-reductive concept of physicalism that describes a world wherein some of its fundamental phenomena can be essentially macrophysical, i.e., physical phenomena which cannot be reduced to, nor understood purely in terms of the properties of their microphysical components.
5. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Diana Soeiro

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The epoch of the Anthropocene is on the verge of becoming scientifically acknowledged by the science of Geology. In what way does this concern Philosophy? In this paper, we evaluate how the new concept of the Anthropocene contrasts with the classical concept of Nature, aiming to identify the territory of both. In order to do this we take as our starting point the approach of Francis Bacon (1561-1626) which separates God and Nature. This later translated into the separation of Nature and Culture. The latter dualism is contested by Philippe Descola (b.1942) who defends the convergence of both. Bruno Latour (b.1947) and Timothy Morton (b.1968) consider the concept of nature as obsolete. Ulrich Beck (1944-2015), Erie C. Ellis and Mark Lynas (b.1973) claim that science will be able to cope with whatever changes the Anthropocene brings. We consider that all these claims, albeit apparently contrasting, are grounded in belief and as a counter-proposal we aim to bring to the table the concept of spirituality as essential to re-evaluate what Nature is today in the light of the Anthropocene.
6. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Sue Spaid

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Until Speculative Realism’s arrival a few years back, few philosophers found it problematic to view nature as a cultural construct, circumscribed and dependent on human attitudes (Berleant, 1992: 53). While I share speculative realists’ goal to strengthen philosophy’s mind-independence (Immanuel Kant’s goal as well), I worry that isolating nature as beyond human minds not only absolves human responsibility, but eradicates “kinship” relations, which capture non-hu­man nature providing for and sustaining human beings, and vice versa. To develop an environmental philosophy that affords mind-independence and offers evidence, unlike Positive Aesthetics, which idealizes wilderness, I discuss: 1) the pro/cons of nature’s mind-independence, 2) the implications for aspection, 3) the need for assessment tools that guide human action, 4) the reasons for grounding ethical action in kinship, and 5) recent research that suggests biodiverse cities exemplify the kinship model. Inseparable from nature, human beings are kindred participants in shared eco-systems.
7. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Rui Sampaio da Silva

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
John McDowell gave an important contribution to the debate on naturalism in the contemporary philosophy by proposing a “naturalism of the second nature”, which distinguishes itself by setting aside the conception of nature promoted by the modern science and for being based on the idea of second nature, reinterpreted in the light of the Sellarsian notion of the “logical space of reasons”, understood as the horizon of our world experience. He argues, accordingly, for the unboundedness of the conceptual sphere, which allows him to claim, in Mind and World, that experience justifies our beliefs because it is already conceptually articulated. The naturalism of the second nature extends to the domain of moral philosophy, gaining the form of a virtue ethics. The article points out some of the main problems of McDowell’s naturalism, like the difficulties underlying the experience conceptualism and the charge of idealism, offering also answers, inspired by McDowell himself, to these problems.

prémio prof. doutor joaquim cerqueira gonçalves para alunos do 1.º ciclo/ cursos de licenciatura (2016)

8. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Luís Martinho

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Avid critic of the knowledge dependent of the old masters, Francisco Sanches strikes a direct blow at the heart of Aristotelic philosophy with the aim of demystifying the author par excellence of Scholasticism. Francisco Sanches, in this context, attempts to show that the human mind, for as sharp as it may be, is always fallible. In fact, shadows of truth show themselves if we search carefully. The whole history of philosophy proves this assertion, or had it not been more than a history of what was humanly capable of investigating. Some authors, possibly the most distinguishable, transcended the humanly capable of other authors, being therefore, unfortunately, treated as masters of knowing. Unfortunately indeed, as this dogmatic acceptance stagnates knowledge. Francisco Sanches visits exactly the classic masters of knowledge, and humbly shows the fallibility of the sapient assertions of Aristoteles.
9. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Raoul Andrei Marian

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper, my aim was to analyze the Kantian judgment of taste, by explaining its particular features and how they differentiate it from “good” and “agreeable”, and also I tried to explain its foundations. Besides this topic, I approached the question of aesthetic experience, by trying to understand how it takes place, who are its participants, and what possible relation is between them. At the end, I tried to present an interpretation of the conclusions drawn over the essay.

dissertações

10. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Paulo Frazão Roberto

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
11. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Bruno Giancarli

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

recensões

12. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48
Fabrizio Boscaglia

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

13. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

14. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

15. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48

view |  rights & permissions | cited by

16. Philosophica: International Journal for the History of Philosophy: Volume > 24 > Issue: 48

view |  rights & permissions | cited by