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articles

1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Dustin Locke

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This paper describes an application of mastery learning to the teaching of philosophical writing—an approach I call “the Levels System.” In this paper, I explain the Levels System, how I integrate it into my course, and the pedagogical research supporting the principles of mastery learning on which it is built. I also compare the Levels System to Maryellen Weimer’s “menu approach,” Linda Nilson’s “specifications grading,” and Fred Keller’s “personalized system of instruction.” I argue that the Levels System has many of the virtues of these other systems and some additional virtues of its own.
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2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Sally J. Scholz Orcid-ID

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Designing a successful graduate seminar should account for more than just the content to be conveyed and the completion of the standard seminar paper. This article dissects the seminar structure, revealing some of what is obscured by the “hidden curriculum” of graduate education, with an eye toward transforming the climate in philosophy. I begin with a brief review of literature on graduate teaching and inclusive teaching in philosophy. I then examine four components of a typical graduate seminar: the faculty instructor of graduate courses, the graduate students themselves, the material selection, and the course requirements. Reflecting on the graduate seminar compels revisiting learning goals, ensuring inclusivity and accessibility, and adopting a more intentional approach to graduate course design that ties course goals to specific activities and assessments for the life of the professional philosopher.
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3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Julia Staffel

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This article is about teaching probability to students of philosophy who don’t aim to do primarily formal work in their research. These students are unlikely to seek out classes about probability or formal epistemology for various reasons, for example because they don’t realize that this knowledge would be useful for them or because they are intimidated by the material. However, most areas of philosophy now contain debates that incorporate probability, and basic knowledge of it is essential even for philosophers whose work isn’t primarily formal. In this article, I explain how to teach probability to students who are not already enthusiastic about formal philosophy, taking into account the common phenomena of math anxiety and the lack of reading skills for formal texts. I address course design, lesson design, and assignment design. Most of my recommendations also apply to teaching formal methods other than probability theory.
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4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Dana Trusso Orcid-ID

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Democratizing the syllabus has been discussed in the fields of sociology and political science but rarely in philosophy. In this paper I will draw upon my experience of teaching Philosophy of Love in an online modality to examine the impact on motivation when students fill in the gaps presented in a democratic syllabus.
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book reviews

5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Olcay Bayraktar

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6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Paul J. D'Ambrosio

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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Kevin M. DeLapp

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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Mehmet Ali Dombayci Orcid-ID

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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Lona Gaikis

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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Catlyn Keenan

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11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Fraser Landry

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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
David Sackris

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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Daniel G. Shaw

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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Angeliki G. Vasilopoulou

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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1

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articles

16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 4
Chong Choe-Smith

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Academic internships are increasingly common in other disciplines, but have not been discussed or implemented widely in the discipline of philosophy. This article fills this gap by discussing the potential benefits of philosophy internships and addressing two important questions: whether there is something different about philosophy—possibly its abstractness, versatility, or what I refer to as “pluripotency”—that renders the benefits of internships out of reach for many philosophy students, and whether philosophy faculty should be responsible for developing and implementing philosophy internships. In this article, I argue that there is nothing about the discipline itself that prevents philosophy majors from experiencing the benefits of academic internships and that, among the different possible internship coordinators, philosophy faculty bear primary responsibility for developing academic internships in philosophy and assisting philosophy students as they transition from college to professional career.
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 4
Lisa Gilbert

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While discussion is a hallmark of philosophy teaching methods, some instructors express doubt as to the possibilities for its meaningful implementation in online classes. Here, I report on a routine that utilized synchronous and asynchronous discussion strategies to promote community-building and critical engagement in an educational philosophy class forced online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Before class, students used social annotation software to collaboratively read a text. During class, we pursued whole-group discussion using student-centered strategies before breaking into partners for small-group work on a written discussion prompt. After class, students individually replied to the prompts written by these small groups. Results show that students found that this routinized structure promoted engagement with the course content and each other, ultimately building a community that supported critical thinking in the virtual classroom. Implications are raised regarding instructor workload and control over course outcomes.
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18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 4
Anna Gotlib, Orcid-ID Ruth Groenhout Orcid-ID

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The COVID-19 pandemic and its conflict with science denialism raises the question of how philosophers teaching bioethics should respond to debates concerning truth, scientific evidence, and medical treatment raised by their students. We suggest that philosophical responses to the spread of serious disinformation in the health care context can be effectively explored in bioethics courses through discussions of informed consent, patient autonomy, the nature of scientific evidence, and moral responsibly for one’s views in ways that are especially important in the current pandemic era. Addressing these issues offers important epistemological grounding for students who will soon be making biomedical judgments and policies, as well as students who, like the rest of us, will be on the receiving end of those decisions. We argue that helping all of our students to understand the epistemological structures, and the moral consequences, of biomedicine and its detractors is a vital part of the professor’s responsibility.
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19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 4
Robert Weston Siscoe, Orcid-ID Zachary Odermatt Orcid-ID

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It is no secret that we, as a society, struggle to have productive conversations about race and gender. Discussions about these issues are beset with obstacles, from the inherent power dynamics between conversation partners to the fear that participants feel about saying something harmful. One practice that can help address these difficulties is intergroup dialogue—sustained, small group discussions with participants from a variety of social identities. In this paper, we detail how we incorporated intergroup dialogue into a 120-student “Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender” course, providing a blueprint for anyone who wants to help their students develop the ability to take part in fruitful conversations surrounding these challenging topics. We provide strategies for how to design intergroup dialogues to avoid many of the common pitfalls of such conversations, strategies that ultimately helped our students become more likely to initiate and participate in worthwhile discussions on race and gender. We expect our experiences to be especially helpful for instructors of large courses, where making time for small group dialogue is quite challenging, but many of the practices we used can also be adapted for smaller scale courses as well.
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book reviews

20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 4
Russell W. Askren

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