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Displaying: 21-31 of 31 documents


session 8: aquinas on knowledge: theory and practice

21. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83
Catherine Jack Deavel

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I will defend a principle at work in Thomas Aquinas’s argument that the human intellect must be immaterial in order to know material things in SummaTheologica, Ia, q.75, a.2. Thomas relies on the position that whatever knows certain things would be impeded in this knowledge if it contained in itself thesesame things. Thus, if humans can, in principle, know all material things, then the intellect cannot be material. The position that a material intellect would be limited in knowledge of material things is perhaps the most controversial part of the argument. I will articulate a version of this argument and argue that two objections to Thomas’s argument, offered by Norman Kretzmann and Robert Pasnau, fail, due in large part to a misunderstanding of proper objects of cognition.
22. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83
Andrew M. Lang

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The principles whereby the reason operates in ethically complicated situations has been subject to long-standing debates in Catholic Philosophy. A classic text which exemplifies this is Aquinas’s consideration of self-defensive killing. In this paper I clarify two central issues in double-effect reasoning debates surrounding this text. Both issues are connected to the seemingly simple but actually complex task of accounting for the “chosen means” of self-defense. The first issue is whether the “chosen means” are also able to be considered a “proximate end,” to which the intention is directed. The second is determining whether the assailant’s death is related to the “chosen means” per se and therefore to the rest of the moral action. Resolving these issues will provide grounds for answering the broader question implicit in the situation of self-defensive killing: what is to be done when human actions would inevitably entail that some evil is instrumentally tied to realizing some good?

acpa reports and minutes

23. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83
R. E. Houser

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24. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83
George Leaman Orcid-ID

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25. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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26. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83
R. E. Houser

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27. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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28. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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29. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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30. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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31. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 83

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