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Displaying: 21-37 of 37 documents


21. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Nicola Misani

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Stakeholders are often sceptical of a firm’s engagement in corporate social responsibility (CSR). They may doubt whether the firm reports its engagement honestly and, even when this engagement is seen as real, they can still doubt whether the firm is driven by genuine motives or self-interest. A firm’s motives are important for stakeholders, because genuine motives are stable and can be counted upon, while self-interest depends on circumstances that could change. This paper uses attribution theory to develop a two-stage model of how stakeholder motive attributions contribute to the development of stakeholder trust is presented. This model separates issues of credibility of CSR information from issues of trustworthiness of a firm, which previous research has usually mixed. The model implies that both values-driven and strategic-driven motives can confer credibility to a firm, but only values-driven motives can support stakeholder trust that is not merely calculative.

22. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Akwasi Opoku-Dakwa

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In prior research, moral intensity has been proposed as a characteristic of situations that influences ethical decision-making. In this paper, I seek to apply the concept of moral intensity in the context of work engagement. I first propose moral intensity as a characteristic of work tasks. I then explain why moral intensity of a task should increase work engagement. I test this hypothesis in a pilot study using a sample of students. Results of the study support the hypothesis that moral intensity is an objective characteristic of work tasks that is positively related to work engagement through its influence on perceived impacts of the work. Implications and limitations of the study are discussed.

23. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Jean Pasquero

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CSR scholarship does not enjoy the centrality it should have. One way to replace it at the center of the conversation on business and society, is to make it more attractive to neighboring disciplines by demonstrating its unique added value. An essential move would be to acknowledge the contribution of these disciplines and to extend CSR models and theories to include their own core concepts. This process of cross-fertilization, called hybridization, can start with Political Science (recognizing various brands of public interest and national CSR) and Organizational Theory (rooting legitimacy and other normative schemes in social processes). A number of theoretical enrichments would ensue, from embedding CSR within the multiple levels that define it, to transdisciplinary perspectives, thereby increasing the relevance of the field across the social sciences. The growing international policy shift towards Sustainable Development (as defined by its three pillars of economic proficiency, social equity and environmental protection) provides a promising empirical source to take CSR theorizing beyond its traditional confines and make it a valued reference for both academia and decision-makers, corporate as well as political.

24. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Viviana Pilato, Jean-Pasca Gond, Matteo Pedrini

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This study examines how multinational corporations’ (MNCs) subsidiaries manage institutional complexity when deploying their corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities in Africa. Building on insights from international business studies of CSR and recent development in comparative institutionalism, we explore how distinct institutional forces combine to shape subsidiary’s CSR behaviour across five African countries. Relying on 33 interviews with managers at 26 subsidiaries operating in Angola, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya and South Africa, we identified patterns of variations in CSR deployment across these countries. Our findings reveal that MNCs’ subsidiaries mobilize the CSR strategy of their parent firm to demonstrate their compliance with their headquarters’ expectations, but also complement this minimum level of requirement with elements that reflect the needs from the local business system. As a whole, our findings reveal the complex bricolage undertaken by subsidiary’s managers to tailor their CSR strategy in ways that meet the contradictory institutional forces they face.

25. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Kimberly M. Reeve

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This paper addresses the characteristics and skills that the leader of a financially viable nonprofit organization needs to have. The nonprofit sector continues to intersect with the business sector by providing services and programming that the government and private sectors are not willing to or cannot provide. However, the nonprofit sector now faces an environment that includes increased competition for funds as it attempts to meet demands for more specialized services. In this context, is there a specific type of leader that is needed to ensure a nonprofit’s financial sustainability? Should a nonprofit simply become more like a business and adhere to common for-profit leadership and staff-building principles, or do nonprofits require a unique set of skills and a different type of staff culture? This paper will present a discussion of subject matter expert’s perceptions on the characteristics of nonprofit leaders that are needed for today’s financially viable nonprofit.

26. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Bryan M. Robinson, Jacobus A. Jonker

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The Chinese owned Jiuxing Mine withdrew from Madagascar due to community protests against its operations. This research considered the theoretical constructs of Carrol’s Pyramid of Social Responsibility (Carroll and Buchholtz, 2006: 39) and the Continuum of Community Engagement (Bowen, Newenham-Kahindi and Herremans, 2010: 304) in three comparative mining case studies in South Africa, China, and Madagascar. The case studies identified possible reasons for Jiuxing Mine’s failure to engage the local population’s approval, and proposed a range of recommendations for mining companies to effectively engage with their local communities.The case studies confirmed that transformative community engagement in the mining sector provided the opportunity to identify negative externalities from land acquisition and mining operations; encouraged collaborative engagement with national and local government, other industry players, community representatives, community members, and community organisations; facilitates collaborative agreements for the benefit of all parties; and encourages an integrated strategy that maximises social investment outcomes.

27. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Linda C. Rodriguez, Ivan Montiel, Michael L. Ekema-Agbaw

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This in-process study asks how companies in different cultural regions (East, West) with different macro-risk levels (e.g. Low Risk, Moderate Risk21) understand the Corporate Sustainability (CS) practices. For this developing qualitative study, we review the influence of two components of the National Business Systems, culture and country risk, for firm level Corporate Sustainability (CS) practices as expressed by East / West firms in the Global Reporting Initiative’s (GRI) database – a global initiative that works toward the standardization of organizational sustainability reporting. This study is important because many concepts of CS stem from Western regions like North America and Western Europe; therefore, we expect that Eastern firms would conceptualize and implement CS differently.

28. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Mark S. Schwartz

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This paper evaluates Porter and Kramer’s ‘creating shared value’ (CSV) approach against the value, balance, and accountability (VBA) business and society model proposed by Schwartz and Carroll (2008). The analysis finds that while CSV potentially meets the requirement of creating value, their approach fails to properly address the balance and accountability elements of the VBA model. As a result, the CSV approach cannot presently be considered as an underpinning or overarching construct for the business and society field.

29. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Shireesh, Sushil Kumar

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Drivers of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) are generally weak in developing countries like India and the very action of making CSR spending mandatory in India highlights the nonchalance exhibited by firms when it comes to pursuing CSR voluntarily. This study reviews literature on CSR in India, brings into perspective the new legislation that makes it mandatory for firms of a particular size to spend on CSR activities and analyzes the financial spend figures on CSR by Top 100 companies in India during the year 2014-15 to unearth emerging trends. A large majority of the top 100 firms in India have failed to spend the prescribed amount towards CSR activities during the first year after the new legislation came into force. Private sector and public sector companies report significantly different behavior with respect to their CSR spending and shortfall. The study concludes by providing recommendations for making the policy more effective.

30. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Sarah Lilian Stephen

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Neoinstitutional theory relatively neglects the process of new practices evolving into "protoinstitutions". These being important in understanding institutional change, the paper adopts a historical perspective to generate propositions by examining the genesis of a practice (socially responsible investment funds), with incongruent logics, in an increasingly mature organisational field (financial services) with dominant logics. Apart from identifying the inus conditions that determine the success or failure of new practices, it is illustrated that the process did not follow the existing generalisations on institutional change due to crucial factors, such as the nature of (and pressures exerted by) the incumbent institutions and logics, the nature of the new practice, and the presence (or absence) of certain events. Additionally, the demolition of existing logics and institutions is not easily achievable especially when a new practice differs from the incumbents on the basis of its driving logics.

31. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Kimberly Tribou

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The “wage gap” statistically refers to the fact that the median wage of an American woman is 79% of the median wage of an American man. This paper examines the extent to which companies disclose equitable pay as recommended by GRI standards and in advance of a proposed Obama-era presidential mandate. Using the incidence of and content from disclosures contained in firm standalone sustainability reports, I find that firms did not significantly increase their disclosure of compensation and remuneration policies or their disclosure of policies intended to promote equal representation of women and equal compensation of women. My results thus support the difficulty in identifying and quantifying the wage gap and suggest that significant action – actions extending beyond new laws, proposed regulatory requirements, or sustainability accounting frameworks – is required to motivate corporate social change.

32. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Sandra Waddock, Dawn R. Elm, Jerry M. Calton, Dima Jamali, Colin Higgins

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This workshop asked: How does business in society move beyond the ambition to develop excellent scholarship that helps make the world a better place to impact? The narrowness of current assessment criteria for ‘impact’ is becoming increasingly evident and criticized. Simultaneously, social media, blog outlets, easy-to-make and post videos and audios, and other means of communicating beyond scholarly audiences have become more prominent. We raised some of the following questions: How can and should, if at all, we as a field move beyond narrow metrics and ‘ambitions’ to have actual impact on the world? How should we think about what impact means in practice? How do we maintain credibility as scholars yet do research that achieves impact that shifts practice, and possibly the world of business in society for the better? What role should social media, blogging, public intellectualism, video and audio production, and teaching play in assessing scholarly impact?

33. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Stephanie A. Welcomer, Linda Sama, Amy Wallis, Mark E. Haggerty

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This workshop explores cultural trends and their effects on students’ learning and the classroom environment. We discuss these trends and their implications, and propose pedagogical approaches and exercises that underline the importance of single-tasking, discriminating between facts and opinion, interdisciplinary analysis, and critical thinking.

34. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017
Karen Maas

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35. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017

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36. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017

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37. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2017

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