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Displaying: 21-40 of 53 documents


corporate social responsibility / corporate social performance

21. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Marta de la Cuesta, Carmen Valor, Francisco Pablo Holgado

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The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the quality of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) reporting of Spanish companies listed in the IBEX-35 stock index Firstly, it establishes four requisites for quality in ESG reporting. Secondly, it evaluates whether ESG reports comply with these requirements. Using a benchmark tool based on GRI3 we can conclude that the GRI has resulted in some standardization of corporate social and environmental reporting, particularly as regards to format, but their approach to indicators is unlikely to produce high quality information that is relevant, comparable, complete and accessible to all stakeholders. Also, there seems to be evidence that reporting is orientated to satisfy shareholders and investors´ demands rather than to other stakeholders´.
22. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Robbin Derry

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This paper challenges the field to move beyond strategic philanthropy to a more encompassing concept of sustainable philanthropy. A brief history of philanthropic practices is presented, as well as a discussion of contemporary approaches to corporate philanthropy. The model of sustainable philanthropy developed here advocates integrating a triple bottom line approach with the strategic practice of corporate giving. It shifts the traditional model of powerful donor and a powerless recipient, to one where both donor and recipient must work harder to identify a partner that shares their intrinsic values and objectives. The aim of sustainable philanthropy is to establish a working partnership with broadly shared goals and openly acknowledged benefits.
23. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Christel Dumas, Céline Louche

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In this paper, we compare and contrast institutional theory and convention theory on the concept of mimetism, suggesting how they can cross-pollinate each other and more specifically how the self-referential quality of collective beliefs improves the understanding of mimetic isomorphism. We test this proposition with the case of responsible investment’s mainstreaming.First level results decompose the history of RI into five successive periods. A content analysis of articles on RI in the financial press leads to second level results consisting in a number of salient representations of RI, which we consider to be the dominant conventions. The data is structured using a bracketing strategy, which allows a longitudinal analysis of conventions and their evolution over the five RI periods.
24. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Aimee Dars Ellis, Michael McCall

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As a subject of study, rebates have been investigated by researchers who are interested in understanding the characteristics of individuals who are likely to use rebates as well as the decision-making process that leads shoppers to redeem rebates or not. Additionally, researchers have studied the most effective rebate vehicles. An unrelated, but well-established research stream is dedicated to cause marketing. No extant studies, however, look at cause marketing campaigns that utilize rebates. In this theoretical paper, we review the key findings of the literature on rebates, discuss how cause rebates and typical rebates differ, and offer propositions to guide future research on rebates for a cause.
25. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Aimee Dars Ellis

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Many organizations are utilizing corporate social responsibility initiatives that require employee participation. These initiatives, which involve social action at work (SAW), can be a source of reputational gains, benefit the community, and increase employee organizational identification (Ellis, 2009). Although research has been conducted on employee volunteer programs (EVP), one aspect of SAW, those studies have not identified the characteristics of employees who are most likely to participate in EVP nor have they considered the wide range of SAW programs. In the field of Sociology, extensive research has been conducted to identify characteristics of volunteers, but these volunteer programs are outside the context of CSR initiatives. This research addresses this gap by identifying the characteristics of those who engage in SAW across a wide range of activities. The results of the study can help hone future research questions and aid practitioners in developing and marketing SAW programs that resonate with employees and maximize participation for the good of the employees, organization, and community as a whole.
26. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Jae Hwan Lee, Ronald. K. Mitchell

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In this paper, we attempt to refine the concept of corporate citizenship. Traditionally, research on corporate citizenship has paid greater attention to corporateduties, leaving corporate rights relatively unattended in the corporate citizenship literature. However, some scholars have recently explored corporate citizenship as the corporation’s implementation of both of its respected rights and duties. Others have conceptualized the corporate citizenship concept with a specific focus on the corporation’s expansion of its new duties and rights. Integrating existing conceptualizations of corporate citizenship, we propose a refined definition of corporate citizenship as a dynamic process by which corporations implement and expand their respective corporate rights and duties.
27. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Gerald W. McLaughlin, Josetta S. McLaughlin

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Colleges of business rankings purport to address relative performance on programs such as sustainability. The primary criticism of rankings is that providers have not established reliability or validity of the ranking. This study examines whether The Global 100 sustainability ranking is sufficiently unique to claim that it is based on attributes not used for non-sustainability ranking (divergent validity) and whether it is appropriately related to independent characteristics expected to measure this attribute (convergent validity).
28. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Terry B. Porter, Patti C. Miles

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Multiple pressures are today propelling the private sector towards corporate social responsibility (CSR) without detracting from the firm’s competitive advantage,profitability, and hence, its own sustainability. Achieving credible CSR is often a longterm process, taking years to fully develop, institute, and pay off financially, yet current research is limited by its ambiguity and methodological inconsistencies, and by the short time horizon of many studies. This paper responds to this gap by developing and testing a multifaceted, long-term model of firm sustainability practices. The dataset we develop spans ten years, which to our knowledge is the first time such a cumulative long-term view has become possible in the study of CSR actions. Our findings reveal a number of significant relationships which together suggest the existence of a long-term “halo” effect in CSR-committed companies, whereby responsible behavior in the CSR arena is positively associated with other positive aspects of firm operations, including financial performance and a lack of evidence of “greenwashing.”
29. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Kathleen Rehbein, Frank G.A. de Bakker, Patrick Bernhagen, Andrew Crane

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This paper contains a short outline of the rationale behind a workshop aimed at seeking connections between corporate social responsibility and corporate political activity. Two ‘provocateurs’ gave their view on these connections. After this kick-off two groups of ~10 persons each engaged in lively discussions on these connections, identifying a range of issues for further research and an interest in keeping this issue on the agenda.
30. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Linda C. Rodríguez, Ivan Montiel

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We look at the relationship of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and country risk. We conceptualize the relationship first by asking if there is a correlationand then positing the directionality of the relationship. We posit that there is an inverse or negative correlation of implicit CSR with country risk and a positive correlation between explicit CSR and country risk. Understanding this relationship can help firms respond to a variety of external pressures such as those from activist organizations and stockholder disciplining; thus, preventing firms from the need to “bolt” on CSR strategies to existing corporate strategies, as well as to help fulfill social needs within the community, mitigate political risks, and improve firm reputation.
31. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Maria Rosa Rovira Val, Anna Zinenko, Ivan Montiel

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The last ten years have seen particularly strong changes in corporate social responsibility (CSR), with the introduction of new instruments such as the UnitedNations Global Compact (UNGC) in 2000 and the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Reporting Guidelines in 1998. These instruments propose voluntary tools to address CSR. In November 2010, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) released the new social responsibility guidance under ISO 26000. It is important to understand the contribution of ISO 26000 to already existing CSR instruments and the connections between them. This article discusses whether companies need ISO 26000 if they already implemented UNGC and GRI: is there redundancy or complementarity?
32. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Mark S. Schwartz, David Saiia

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The paper explores the ongoing debate between the narrow version of CSR proposed by Milton Friedman and the broader version of CSR, which includes additional ethical and/or philanthropic obligations. Implications are then discussed.
33. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Bilge Uyan-Atay

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Prior research has tended to focus on the influences upon how much organizations contribute to charitable or community cases paying relatively little attentionto the recipients of these donations or how firms develop preferences in respect of them. This study, in order to fill these gaps in the literature, focuses on two main aspects of CCI within 500 biggest companies situated in Turkey. Firstly, it aims to explore how companies manage their CCI activities. The type and level of the managers who are the decision makers and the departments from which CCI decisions are taken will be examined. This helps to understand the potential objectives and strategic importance of giving. Also it shows whether a firm has a stable orientation to CCI, or a more ad hoc orientation. Secondly, it aims to analyze the preferences of companies in respect of the area of priorities and exclusions. We argue that institutional environments can shape the CCI activities. Exploring the local conditions of the countries can give reasons for investment in specific areas.
34. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Isabel Carrero, Carmen Valor

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Information asymmetries are regarded as the main obstacle for consumers to buy responsibly. CSR labels are considered the best tool to give consumers information about the brand's social and environmental performance. Yet, the information and credibility gap associated to the labels may render labels useless. This study aims to unveil the relationship of Spanish consumers with CSR labels, in order to assess the posited consequences of the information and credibility gap. To do so, 385 consumers were interviewed at the main shopping centers in Madrid. The findings support the hypothesized gaps, which leads to recommend public policies in order to improve the effectiveness of CSR labels as an information tool.

environmental management and regulation

35. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
John M. Holcomb

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This paper applies an eight-step model of crisis management to the Gulf Oil disaster and discusses potential legal liabilities for BP. The eight steps are: ascertaining the facts, portraying the problem, allocating responsibility, responding to critics, adopting new policies, implementing new procedures, utilizing political/legal tactics, and costs in money and credibility. While crisis management responses often fall into either uniformly positive or uniformly negative patterns and outcomes, the BP case falls into a more complex pattern, where the company did some things well and other things poorly, with BP making its worst mistakes in the pre-crisis stage. After examining BP’s response, the longer version of this paper examines the regulatory role and the application of the capture theory to the Minerals Management Service of the Department of Interior. That section and associated references are available upon request to the author.
36. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Jeanne M. Logsdon, John F. Mahon

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This paper develops a two-part model of the crucial roles that episodic memory and perceptual filters play in responses to organizational crisis. We examine thecascading impacts of episodic memory, the types of filters that shape stakeholder responses to crisis, and subsequent impacts on reputation. A sound wave analogy is developed to understand the complexity of organizational crisis. The model is partially applied to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster.
37. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Charles Oldroyd, Johanne Grosvold, Andrew Millington

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governance issues

38. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Laura Albareda

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The aim of the paper is to study the stages of development of corporate responsibility global standards and initiatives based on the development of integratednetworked governance. I propose a matrix based on four development stages built along a continuum and in crescendo collaboration among different global standards and multistakeholder initiatives. The research is based on the concept of the analysis of the integrated networked governance on an analysis of the Global Action Network (Waddell, 2011).
39. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Yves Fassin

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This paper makes an analysis of the recent collapse of Fortis, a major European bank, from the perspective of shareholder activism and social movement theory to illustrate the limits of corporate governance. Some specific issues of the Fortis affair – and more especially the chaotic events at the general assembly - illustrate the application of social movement theory to shareholder activism, besides agency theory problems and conflicts of interests. Paradoxes between legal constraints and principles of good corporate governance are presented. The Fortis case illustrates the limits of the juridical bureaucracy in situations of urgency. The case illustrates the limits of corporate governance. Governance systems need to find appropriate mechanisms to align the voting rights with the long-term interests of the company. We argue for new criteria that will restrict representation to loyal shareholders with a long-term commitment. Good governance mechanisms should prevent opportunistic behaviour and encourage a responsible attitude.

public affairs, public policy, and regulation

40. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Naomi A. Gardberg, Donald H. Schepers, Louis Lipani

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U.S. corporations have long tried to enact a favorable business environment via political activities such as lobbying and campaign contributions. This particular strategy is receiving increased attention due to the recent Supreme Court decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which establishes that corporations have the same rights with regard to political activities as individuals. In this work, we examine the nature of corporate political activity and the need for accountability; define transparency in the context of corporate political activity; and examine the antecedents for corporate political disclosure. We then test our model on the S&P 100 using an index of corporate political disclosure that we developed. We find that opportunities to participate in political activities, dependence on government contracts and prior disclosure on other topics such as the environment lead to more disclosure. The intensity of the regulatory environment appears to have no influence.