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21. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
C’Zar Bernstein

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In this talk presented at the 2022 conference of the Catholic Bar Association, C’Zar Bernstein unpacks the meaning of the word person in the Fourteenth Amendment and, through his exegesis, identifies philosophical arguments that may be instrumental in affording legal protection to the most vulnerable members of society.

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22. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Most Rev. Joseph Fred Naumann

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notes & abstracts

23. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Vince A. Punzo

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24. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor

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book reviews

25. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Abigail Wilkinson Miller

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26. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Jeanatan Hall

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27. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton

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28. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Arina Grossu Agnew

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essays

29. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
John F. Brehany

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The first edition of the Ethical Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services was published in 1948. Since then, it has undergone two major revisions and several smaller ones. The following essay explores the history of the ERDs and the important aspects of these revisions.

30. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2

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commentaries

31. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Jozef D. Zalot

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Part One of the ERDs addresses the balance Catholic health care institutions must strike between their mission to carry out the healing ministry of Christ and the demands of the US health care system. Divided into two sections, the commentary begins by proposing revisions to the Part One introduction focusing on enhanced application of Catholic social teaching principles and a renewed call for robust conscience and religious liberty protections. It then proposes additions to the Part One directives designed to help Catholic health care respond with integrity to the many contemporarychallenges it faces, and to more full live out its mission and identity.
32. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Rev. Hyacinth Grubb, OP

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Part Two of the Ethical and Religious Directives outlines the responsibility to care for the spiritual needs of patients and residents, following the example of Christ who both healed the sick and forgave them their sins. The proposed revisions to the introduction add a more explicit focus on the dignity of the sick, the redemptive value of suffering, and the potential evangelization that takes place through institutional health care. The proposed revisions to the directives emphasize that patients and residents have a right to receive spiritual and sacramental care. Likewise, Catholic healthcare institutions, medical staff, and pastoral care personnel have an obligation to arrange and provide adequate spiritual and sacramental care.
33. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Rev. Columba Thomas, OP, MD

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The proposed revisions to Part Three of the Ethical and Religious Directives (ERDs)—on the professional-patient relationship—call attention to a number of timely, culturally relevant issues that require an understanding of the dignity of the human person and the true health of body, mind, and spirit. Several key issues newly discussed in these proposed revisions include transgender policies, the question of referrals for unethical clinical interventions, and triage and limited-resource allocation protocols for crisis situations. This paper draws on the theological and philosophical basis forunderstanding the professional-patient relationship, especially in light of the metaphor of Christ the physician, in order to consider how the ERDs effectively address these key issues and promote true healing in Catholic health care.
34. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
DiAnn Ecret; RN, Tracy Winsor, Jozef D. Zalot

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We suggest edits to Part Four of the Ethical and Religious Directives (ERDs) to help the US bishops address and clarify essential Church teachings on specific beginning-of-life issues facing Catholic health care today. As a teaching tool, Part Four must be updated so that Catholic health care professionals and the lay faithful can understand and apply Church teachings to new ethical challenges. Further, more direction and clarity from the ERDs is needed in applying general principles to assisted procreative technologies, pre- and post-viability induction of labor, ectopic pregnancies, genetic screening and diagnosis, and contraception. Catholic health care clinicians and administrators also need to receive ongoing instruction on the ERDs’ teachings as well as the theological and philosophical rationales that undergird them.
35. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Edward James Furton

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Part Five is in considerable need of revision. There have been many developments in medicine and health care that present serious moral challenges to the teachings of the Church. The recommendations below include new emphasis on palliative care and hospice, the right of Catholics to receive the sacraments and visits from the family during illness, further safeguards to protect those in a persistent vegetative state, the immorality of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking (VSED), the permissibility of do not resuscitate (DNR) orders, the limited use of palliative sedation, and the requirement that the standards for determining death be rigorously applied by medical professionals. Other minor recommendations seek to bring greater clarity to the existing directives.

notes & abstracts

36. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Kevin Wilger

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37. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
John S. Sullivan, MD

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38. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor

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book reviews

39. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, OSB

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40. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
K. T. Brizek

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