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Displaying: 41-53 of 53 documents


stakeholder issues and theory

41. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Mengying Feng

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As a consequence of globalization, port performance has become increasingly important for international trade. Different ports perform differently in terms ofthroughput of cargo volume and container TEUs, as they are influenced by a number of factors. This research reviews the literature on the factors with the support of reviewing port performance indicators. The research aims to identify how different port stakeholders evaluate these factors’ importance to their port performances and how they evaluate their factor performances differently. The methodology employs a large-scale questionnaire survey in the ports of Western Europe and Eastern Asia. The findings are presented that different port stakeholders evaluate factor importance and performance differently, which implies that the relevant key port stakeholders should all be included when developing port strategy.
42. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Dirk Johan de Jong, Frank Jan de Graaf

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This paper develops propositions on the added value for SMEs of normatively based, employee-oriented corporate social responsibility (CSR). We suggest that not only motives but also the skills of the owner/manager as an institutional entrepreneur are critical in dealing with institutional variance. Also, the transfer of employee-oriented CSR can have positive results for SMEs that could imply that globalisation is not only a race to the bottom.
43. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Michael L. Barnett, Sunyoung Lee

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Aggregated reputation scores and rankings have been rightly criticized for lacking a theoretical basis by which to weight the individual perceptions that form them. The resulting product can be a score or ranking that fails to represent the perceptions of many or even most stakeholders. Little attention has been paid, however, to the reverse. Rather than focus on how individual perceptions can be represented at an aggregate level, herein we focus on how an aggregated reputation can influence individual perceptions. We hypothesize that ratings have a significant influence on stakeholder perceptions, especially where other information is lacking. Through experiments, we find that exposure to reputation ratings provides stakeholders with an anchor point – information about what others think – and their perceptions of the firm are adjusted relative to this anchor. We suggest future work on reputation delve into the heuristics and biasesboundedly rational stakeholders deploy when assessing firms.
44. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Frank G. A. de Bakker, Iina Hellsten, Anne M. Kok

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This paper contains an exploratory study of networks of activist groups operating versus firms to impact norms on corporate social responsibility. It providessome initial examinations of using webmetrics to trace activist networks and tactics. We conducted an empirical study of an organization that acts like the proverbial “spider in the web” in activist networks in the Netherlands: SOMO, the Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations. Mapping such an organization, in which networks on several themes related to CSR are coordinated, forms a useful entry point for further research.
45. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Marta de la Cuesta, Juan Diego Paredes, Eva Pardo

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This study focuses on the application of multicriteria decision-making techniques, specifically the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), to identify corporate socialresponsibility information which both companies and stakeholders consider relevant and material. This work explains how the AHP methodology was applied in the selection of material indicators in corporate social responsibility reporting, the interpretation of these indicators and their relative importance. The results of this study are summarized in 60 indicators distributed in four areas: environment, economy, corporate governance and social. As this last area contains the greatest number of indicators, it was divided into four sub-areas (human resources, human rights, product responsibility and society).
46. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Karen Paul, Abdul Beydoun

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This study tests the relationship between demographic and psychological variables, particularly positive psychology, and investor preferences. Of thedemographics variables, only gender was related to investor preferences, with women expressing a longer time horizon than men. However, the positive psychology variables of hope and novelty orientation were strongly related to risk tolerance, time horizon, and estate intentions.

teaching issues, research issues, and other topics

47. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Svenja Tams, Paul Caulfield, Darius Nedjati-Gilani

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This paper examines the influence of service learning as a pragmatic skills-based teaching intervention. Conceptually, it builds on literature, legitimizing servicelearning in terms of four educational logics– civic engagement, practical relevance, skill development, and responsibility. We investigate whether service learning can always achieve this broad range of educational objectives, in view of students being increasingly exposed to a logic of ‘educational performance’, which they may perceive to be in conflict with the logics of 'civic engagement' and ‘responsibility’. The theoretical part of this paper reviews the evolution of service learning literature and summarizes insights from experiential learning literature. We also report findings from a controlled field experiment with postgraduate management students. We find that service learning influences students’ self-assessment of management skills and awareness stakeholder needs. Surprisingly, our findings provide no evidence for its influence on attitudes to responsibility.
48. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Denise Baden

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The main contention of this paper is that the underlying aim behind efforts to integrate ethics into the business school curriculum is in order to motivate and enable future business leaders to manage ethically and respond effectively to the challenges of sustainable development. Conceptualising ethics education in terms of eliciting behavioural change enables access into the insights provided by social psychological research into factors affecting behaviour, such as self-efficacy, subjective norms, knowledge, awareness, attitudes and role models. MSc students studying entrepreneurship applied their entrepreneurial skills to help social enterprises achieve their objectives as part of their assessed coursework. With reference to a content analysis of their reflections, it is argued that such placements address these key factors identified as predicting behavioural change in a way that more traditional pedagogies cannot.
49. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Jean-Pascal Gond, Céline Louche, Rieneke Slager, Carmen Juravle, Camilla Yamahaki

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This paper provides a summary of the symposium on the institutional and social construction of Responsible Investment (RI), held at the 22nd IABS conference. In the context of the symposium, we propose to move beyond the dominant focus on the financial impact of RI to consider the potential of emergent institutional and sociological perspectives to explain the practices and concepts related to RI. In doing so, our aim is to explore in greater detail the current changes in the RI infrastructure and the impact of these changes on wider issues of corporate sustainability and social responsibility.
50. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Judith Schrempf, Guido Palazzo

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Consumer surveys confirm two facts: First, consumers are aware of social and ethical side effects of production and consumption. Second, consumers indicate an intention to adapt their consumption behavior. Despite their willingness to change, consumers do not engage in ethical consumption behavior. We assert that the ethical consumer needs to be created and propose two mechanisms how corporations can cocreate the ethical consumer: Influencing external institutional factors and influencing internal psychological factors.
51. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Helen Takacs, Jerry Calton, Nancy Kurland

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This workshop was designed for faculty teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels who incorporate or wish to incorporate climate change and sustainability into their teaching repertoire. Following an introduction, the workshop addressed challenges, frameworks, and models for teaching about climate change and sustainability. Breakout sessions then focused on these three aspects of our teaching. The workshop concluded with a sharing of ideas from the breakout sessions and thoughts on moving forward. A resource list for teaching about climate change was discussed at the workshop and is included herein.

52. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011

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53. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011

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