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61. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Samuel A. Taylor

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62. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Nicholas Charles

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63. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Robert A. Elisher

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64. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Dave Beisecker Orcid-ID

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65. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Deborah K. Heikes

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66. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Alexandra T. Romanyshyn

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67. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Rachael Yonek

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68. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Sarah Woolwine

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69. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
A.G. Holdier

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70. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Levi Durham

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71. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Shannon Hayes

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72. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Michael Portal Orcid-ID

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73. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Emily McGill

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open submission articles

74. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Wargin

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There is currently a tremendous surge in interest in the virtue of humility among contemporary philosophers and psychologists. Yet despite its recent popularity, identifying necessary and sufficient conditions for humility has proven quite difficult. Here, drawing on insights from several ‘inattentive’ accounts of humility, I offer a new account that locates the virtue in a transcendent orientation to the self and others such that one sees the self and others in proper perspective. I call this account the transcendent account of humility.
75. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Patrick Miller

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76. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Anne-Marie Schultz

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articles

77. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Justin Bell

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78. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
G. M. Trujillo, Jr.

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Aristotle argued that you need some wealth to live well. The Stoics argued that you could live well with or without wealth. But the Cynics argued that wealth is a hinderance. For the Cynics, a good life consists in self-sufficiency (autarkeia), or being able to rule and help yourself. You accomplish this by living simply and naturally, and by subjecting yourself to rigorous philosophical exercises. Cynics confronted people to get them to abandon extraneous possessions and positions of power to live better. And while the Cynics were experts in living in this way, their ascetic lifestyles made their message curious to some audiences. This paper reflects on Cynic ascetic practices and the ways others perceived them.
79. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Dan Larkin

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80. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Scott Aikin

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Lucretius follows his symmetry argument that one should not fear death with a dialectical strategy, the squandering argument. The dialectical presumption behind the squandering argument is that its audience is not an Epicurean, so squanders their life. The question is whether the squandering argument (and the other Epicurean arguments that one should not fear death) works on lives that by Epicurean standards are not squandered.