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1. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Andrew Feenberg Function and Meaning: The Double Aspects of Technology
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This paper traces the theoretical background to the split between function and meaning in the modernity theories of Marx, Lukács, Weber and Marcuse. It then discusses attempts to overcome the split in the recent philosophies of technology of Simpson and Borgmann. These attempts fail but help to focus the issue. A discussion of contemporary struggles over information technology offers a more hopeful perspective on a possible resolution of the split and suggests a new look at Heidegger’s phenomenology of action. The conclusion of the paper shows that Heidegger offers resources for addressing the relation of function and meaning which he himself did not develop.
2. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Soren Riis The Ultimate Technology: The End of Technology and the Task of Biology
3. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Don Ihde Heidegger’s Technologies: Pen versus Typewriter
4. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Babette Babich Orcid-ID Heidegger’s Philosophy of Science: Towards a Phenomenology of Questioning as Critique of Calculation
5. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Joydeep Bagchee Commentary on Vishwa Adluri’s “Heidegger’s Encounter with Aristotle: A Theological Deconstruction of Metaphysics”
6. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Vishwa Adluri Heidegger’s Encounter with Aristotle: A Theological Deconstruction of Metaphysics
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This paper examines Heidegger’s concept of facticity in his writings from the 1920s. The sudden ‘discovery’ of facticity in these writings and Heidegger’s subsequent engagement with Aristotle are related to a decision to rethink existence in terms of Luther’s and Paul’s interpretation of early Christianity. Central to this interpretation is the experience of the καιρός and the awaiting of the παρουσία. Heidegger argues that this primordial Christian experience (urchristliche Erfahrung) constitutes a fundamental experience (Grunderfahrung) of factical life and undertakes a destruction of Scholastic theology and the ancient and especially, Aristotelian, ontology upon which it is based.3 Heidegger’s philosophical project thus centers in the recovery of this fundamental experience of facticity through a destructive appropriation of the tradition. In this paper, I argue that one of Heidegger’s key strategies in turning to Aristotle is to exclude cyclical temporality - whether thought of as transmigration of the soul (Plato) or as eternal recurrence (Nietzsche) – which is incompatible with this Christian experience.
7. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Lawrence J. Hatab Commentary on Steven Crowell’s “Agency, Morality, and the Essential Consciencelessness of Action”
8. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Christopher Yates The Necessity of Distress and the Abandonment of Being in Heidegger’s Beiträge zur Philosophie
9. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Steven Crowell Agency, Morality, and the Essential Consciencelessness of Action
10. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Maureen Melnyk Commentary on Christopher Yates’ “The Necessity of Distress and the Abandonment of Being in Heidegger’s Beiträge zur Philosophie (vom Ereignis)”
11. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Christopher Ruth Marx and Heidegger: The Question of the Human
12. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Robert Bernasconi Poets as Prophets and as Painters: Heidegger’s Turn to Language and the Hölderlinian Turn in Context
13. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Scott Campbell Dilthey, Destruction, and the Early Heidegger’s Philosophy of Life
14. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Jussi Backman The Singularity of Being and the Fourfold in the Later Heidegger
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The paper studies the notion of the unique singularity (Einzigkeit, Einmaligkeit) of Being in Heidegger’s work, first and foremost in Contributions to Philosophy. I argue that whereas the Aristotelian metaphysical tradition regards Being as the most universal or “transcendental” notion that comprehends all instances of “to be,” Heidegger, by contrast, addresses Being in a “postmetaphysical” sense as the singularization of each meaningful situation into a unique configuration of a multidimensional meaning-context. I show that the theme of singularity was present in Heidegger’s thinking all the way from his 1915 dissertation on Duns Scotus and the notion of the singular instant (Augenblick) in Being and Time. Finally, I suggest an interpretation of the fourfold (Geviert) as Heidegger’s most developed articulation of the structure of this context-specific singularity of meaningfulness.
15. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Gregory Fried Introduction to and Commentary on Christopher Ruth’s “Marx and Heidegger: The Question of the Human” and Robert Bernasconi’s “Poets as Prophets and Painters: Heidegger’s Turn to Language and the Hölderlinian Turn in Context”
16. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Robert C. Scharff Commentary on Scott Campbell’s “Dilthey, Destruction, and the Early Heidegger’s Philosophy of Life”: Did Heidegger Ever Have a “Philosophy of Life”?
17. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Daniela Vallega-Neu Heidegger’s Poietic Meditations in Das Ereignis (GA 71)
18. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Bret Davis Horizon and Open-Region: Epistemology in Heidegger’s Country Path Conversations (GA 77)
19. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
Pol Vandevelde Commentary on Daniela Vallega-Neu’s “Heidegger’s Poietic Meditations in Das Ereignis (GA 71)”
20. Heidegger Circle Proceedings: Volume > 44
William McNeill Buried Treasure: Greeting and The Temporality of Remembrance in Heidegger’s Lectures on ‘Andenken’