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1. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3/4
Sandra Peterson Socrates Talks to Himself in Plato’s Hippias Major
2. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3/4
Paul Woodruff What is the Question in the Hippias Major?
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The joy he took in Plato’s early dialogues was contagious. Gregory Vlastos introduced me to philosophy when I was nineteen and his example inspired me to continue on the road to scholarship. He loved Socrates and was fascinated by this controversial dialogue, the Hippias Major, which became the subject of my fi rst book. For Vlastos, Plato’s Socrates was a fi gure of almost biblical importance, an example of a life well lived in search of wisdom. Although he was an accomplished academic, Vlastos’ passions always went beyond the academic to fundamental questions of personal and political morality. Socrates’ questions mattered to him deeply, as they do to me.
3. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3/4
D. Z. Andriopoulos Can We Identify an Empiricist Theory of Memory in Plato’s Dialogues?
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Can an empirisist theory of memory be identifi ed in Plato’s dialogues? Research in the dialogues and reconstructing the pertinent references convinced me that- along with the multi-discussed and generally accepted concept of memory within Plato’s metaphysical framework of the theory of knowledge- an empirisist version of memory is utilized by the Athenian philosopher in his argumentations, concerning mainly epistemological issues and problems; in fact, given the republished metaphysical concept of memory, one cannot fi nd (or fi nd only), beyond the orthodox, old interpretation related to metempsychosis, ies attributing to Plato such, perhaps heretic, parallel use of sensorymaterial and empiricist structures. Moreover, I contend that the empiricist version of memory is related, or, can be considered, as a precursor, to a great extent, to the so called empirical theory of memory; the theory where memory is a necessary and decsively functioning constituent to the new and modern theory of knowledge.
4. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Nelly Tsouyopoulos Popper's Spruch "Zuruck zu den Vorsokratikern" aus der Sicht der Biowissenschaften
5. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
L. Wright Induction and Explanation
6. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Robert E. Allinson The Homogeneity and the Heterogeneity of the Concept of the Good in Plato
7. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Ash Gobar A Critique of Current Theories of Truth
8. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
G. Englebretsen What in the World Is the Truth about Logical Space?
9. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
P. Boot The Philosophical Position of the Author of the Dissoi Logoi
10. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
John A. Bailey The Covering Law model in Ethics and History
11. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
M. Fakhry The Imperative and Optative Moods in Ethics
12. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Avrum Stroll The Mimesis Theory
13. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2
Graham McFee Psychology, Aesthetics and Richard Wollheim
14. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Algis Mickunas Trends and Problems in the Current-Marxian Theory
15. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
G. B. Keene Responsible Belief
16. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
M. Glouberman A Problem of Causation and Metaphysical Realism
17. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1/2
Theodore Scaltsas Weakness of Will in Aristotle's Ethics
18. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1/2
Gianluigi Segalerba Das Monster in Uns
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The essay consists in the analysis of the problem of the evil in the man and in the analysis of the remedies which the man can find against the evil. Plato affirms the presence of an active principle of evil in the soul of every man, which coincides with some instincts of the appetitive soul; the opposite principle to the evil is the reason, which needs, though, a correct education in order to be able to fight efficiently against the evil in us. The man can be seen as a battle field of these opposite forces. Plato describes the presence of the evil in us in some passages of Republic Book 9, where he compares the appetitive part of the soul with a monster. The destiny of every person in her earthly existence consists in the continuing control of the appetitive part of the soul, if the status of ethical education is to be reached and maintained. The man who remains in the realm of the opinion, that is, in the realm of the doxa is an individual who only disposes of unstable opinions and who as a consequence do not have authentic remedies against the appetitive part. On the contrary, the individual who can ascend to the realm of being through the hard education represented by arithmetic, geometry, stereometry, astronomy, harmony and, finally, dialectic is really able to contrast the force of the evil within the individual. Ethics is really possible only through the complete education which passes through these disciplines: the more the individuals is theoretically educated, the more the individual is ethically educated. The knowledge of ideas is the only authentic therapy against the evil in us.
19. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1/2
Alexander Nehamas Gregory Vlastos
20. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1/2
David Keyt The Mad Craftsman of the Timaeus